Continuous innovation needed to eliminate malaria

A man studies mosquito samples collected from window traps in the Malaria Control Pilot Project are studied in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
A health worker studies mosquito samples collected from window traps in the malaria control pilot project in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ©Gates Archive/Prashant Panjiar

Investments in malaria eradication

For two decades, we have devoted resources and expertise to a relentless pursuit of malaria eradication, and we have continuously adapted our approach to achieve the greatest possible impact, in partnership with the global community.
Reaching those at risk

We invest in partners that are expanding access to tools on a large scale and investing in data systems that give governments timely and useful information for decision-making.

Harnessing the power of data

We invest in organizations that are working to map malaria’s burden down to the community level and in real time.

Advancing transformative innovation

We invest in organizations that are advancing the next generation of life-saving malaria treatment.

Strengthening support

We invest in organizations that are advocating for progress against malaria and engaging political leaders, influencers, and civil society.

Read next

Rural worker

How do you solve a problem like malaria?

In 2017, malaria accounted for 435,000 deaths globally—less than half the number as at the turn of the millennium. Eradication is possible, but progress has slowed down since previous decades and some fear it may even rebound. Medical historian Mark Honigsbaum explores the challenges we face, what progress really means today, and what we can do to ensure it continues.
By Mark Honigsbaum Medical historian and author
Wendy Wei (right, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation) discusses China's "1-3-7" approach with scientists and public health experts, in an effort to apply the approach in Tanzania.

China's successful elimination of malaria, and its global impact

China’s achievement shows us that it’s possible to eliminate the disease worldwide. Innovative Chinese approaches may provide a successful formula for Africa, which has 90% of the global malaria burden.
By Wendy Wei Senior Program Officer, Malaria
Collaboration is the key to translating promising global health research into real-world solutions.

The Collaboratory: How sharing tools and technologies can shorten the timeline for global health R&D

Collaboration is the key to translating promising global health research into real-world solutions.
By Lynda Stuart Former Deputy Director, Vaccines & Human Immunology, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation